Dr. Michal Perlman


Professor, University of Toronto and Director, Dr. R.G.N. Laidlaw Research Centre, University of Toronto



416-978-0596


Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)


University of Toronto


252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 1V6


Consistent patterns of interaction in young children's conflicts with their siblings


Journal article


Michal Perlman, Hildy S. Ross, Daniel A. Garfinkel
International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 33, {SAGE} Publications, 2009 Jul, pp. 504--515


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APA
Perlman, M., Ross, H. S., & Garfinkel, D. A. (2009). Consistent patterns of interaction in young children's conflicts with their siblings. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33, 504–515.

Chicago/Turabian
Perlman, Michal, Hildy S. Ross, and Daniel A. Garfinkel. “Consistent Patterns of Interaction in Young Children's Conflicts with Their Siblings.” International Journal of Behavioral Development 33 (July 2009): 504–515.

MLA
Perlman, Michal, et al. “Consistent Patterns of Interaction in Young Children's Conflicts with Their Siblings.” International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 33, {SAGE} Publications, July 2009, pp. 504–15.


Abstract

This study investigates whether preschool-aged children show consistent patterns of behaviour in conflicts with their siblings. Consistency was assessed at the nomothetic (i.e., group), idiographic (i.e., individual), and idiosyncratic (i.e., consistent patterns that differed from the norm) levels. We examined conflicts between 19 2-year-old and 19 4-year-old children and their siblings. Both age groups showed consistent idiographic and nomothetic patterns of interactions. Two-year-old children used idiosyncratic patterns of responses to the conflict overtures of others (i.e., they deviated from the norm in consistent ways) while 4-year-old children did not. The variance in the responses of the younger children was greater than that found for the older children. Together these results suggest that as children mature through the preschool years their conflict patterns become more homogeneous. The importance of studying patterns in conflict at all three levels is discussed.


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