Dr. Michal Perlman


Professor, University of Toronto and Director, Dr. R.G.N. Laidlaw Research Centre, University of Toronto



416-978-0596


Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)


University of Toronto


252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 1V6


Early childhood specialization among ECEC educators and preschool children's outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis


Journal article


Gabriella Nocita, Michal Perlman, Evelyn McMullen, Olesya Falenchuk, Ashley Brunsek, Brooke Fletcher, Nellie Kamkar, Prakesh S. Shah
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 53, Elsevier {BV}, 2020, pp. 185--207


Cite

Cite

APA
Nocita, G., Perlman, M., McMullen, E., Falenchuk, O., Brunsek, A., Fletcher, B., … Shah, P. S. (2020). Early childhood specialization among ECEC educators and preschool children's outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 53, 185–207.

Chicago/Turabian
Nocita, Gabriella, Michal Perlman, Evelyn McMullen, Olesya Falenchuk, Ashley Brunsek, Brooke Fletcher, Nellie Kamkar, and Prakesh S. Shah. “Early Childhood Specialization among ECEC Educators and Preschool Children's Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly 53 (2020): 185–207.

MLA
Nocita, Gabriella, et al. “Early Childhood Specialization among ECEC Educators and Preschool Children's Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 53, Elsevier {BV}, 2020, pp. 185–207.


Abstract

Educator early childhood specialization refers to educators having formal certifications, credentials, diplomas, and degrees in early childhood or a related area (e.g., early childhood education, child development, child psychology, child education, and special education). It is used frequently as an indicator in early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality improvement and other initiatives. However, the literature linking educator early childhood specialization to child outcomes has yielded mixed findings. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the associations between educator early childhood specialization and children's cognitive, academic, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. We focused on preschool aged children. Searches of PsycINFO, ERIC, and Medline, websites of large databases, and reference sections of all included studies were conducted up to February 5, 2018. Title, abstract, and paper reviews were conducted by two independent raters to include studies that provided a statistical link between educator early childhood specialization and child outcomes. Sixteen eligible studies (21 samples, n = 15,157 children) were included in the systematic review. Heterogeneity between studies was identified in terms of how educator early childhood specialization was operationalized, conceptualized, and measured. Results from the systematic review revealed very few significant associations. Five meta-analyses of homogenous studies revealed very weak positive associations between educator early childhood specialization and children's language and social skills. No significant associations were identified for children's mathematics, vocabulary, or letter identification skills. Methodological limitations of the literature and the current study, areas for future research, and implications for policy are discussed.




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